If you work in project management, you’ve certainly heard a lot of weird words as you try to figure out what strategy would work best for your team. The Waterfall Approach is one of the many strategies you may encounter as you work on projects and jobs with your team. If you do not know what the Waterfall Approach is, this kind of method segregates project operations into consecutive, chronological phases, each of which is dependent on the preceding phase’s deliverables and corresponds to a task specialisation.

Are you wondering if this method would be a suitable fit for your project management demands? It is important to understand how the waterfall approach employs a sequential procedure to streamline project management and how you can apply parts of it to your particular business.

The entire process is broken down into phases, and the procedures function in the same way as a waterfall does, by water descending and not returning. In this paradigm, after one phase is completed, it is impossible to return to the previous phase.

The following are the phases of Waterfall Approach:

  1. Requirement Gathering and Analysis – A product requirements documents the business needs and product requirements (PRD). This document’s principal mission is to help people comprehend what a product ought to do.
  1. System Design – Any beneficial ideas made during the analysis phase would now be applied to the project or item’s design.
  1. Implementation – This measure indicates use of the business logic, schemas, models, and diagrams established during the design phase.
  1. Integration and Testing – Testing is carried out to find and debug faults in a systematic manner. If the problems are unsolvable, it’s a good idea to look back to past phases to figure out what’s causing them.
  1. Maintenance – Lastly, your business will reach the last phase of its product lifecycle. This is where you handle any client concerns and examine if there is anything that can be made to improve the product.